A Time for tweed

Words by: DUNCAN QUINN

No one really knows why we call it what we do.  But we do know that if you are planning any serious shenanigans in the wild there’s not much that beats Tweed.  Back in the day when it was only worn by bagpipe blowing, caber tossing haggis-heads the original name for tweed was “tweel”, which is Scots for twill.  Probably because it is woven in a twilled rather than a plain pattern. But sometime around 1830, a London merchant received a letter from a Hawick cloth supplier offering some tweels. He couldn’t read the handwriting, figured it was a trade-name taken from the river Tweed that flows through the Scottish Borders where Tweed is made, and hey presto…subsequently the goods were advertised as Tweed, and the name has remained ever since.

Its what Tenzing was wearing as he summited Everest numerous times.  Its what Prince William swans around in when he’s shooting grouse at Balmoral.

Traditionally the realm of the upper classes for country-clothing like shooting jackets, tweed became popular among the Edwardian middle classes who associated it with the leisurely pursuits of the elite.  And its what we recommend for seriously cold weather instead of an overcoat.

Take New York city in the winter for example.  Its minus 15 Celsius and it has snowed yet again.  Its cold as balls.  And you don’t want to be the chucklehead in the “three season” department store suit with the overcoat that doesn’t fit.  You want to be the guy in the tweed, with a nice thick cashmere pullover and a cool scarf nonchelantly bowling around as if it was summer in St Tropez.

This stuff was created by nutters in skirts who’s armies were feared the world over.  Why do you think the Romans built a wall to keep them out?  It wasn’t because they had decided they didn’t want to conquer any more real estate…

So if its good enough to run through the bramble bushes with your jewels hanging out as you chase some poor centurion all over creation its certainly good enough to hunt on the mean streets of New York, London, or anywhere else for that matter.

We’re making one right now for a character in Alaska.  In colors to compliment his black on black 599 Ferrari.  You don’t have to buy the Ferrari to make this stuff good.  But we won’t say it doesn’t help…

Words by DUNCAN QUINN